Innovation and
Education

ISSN(Online) 2524-8502

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  • Empirical Research 2021-04-21

    Evaluation of immediate impact of Faculty Development Programme using a pretestâ

    Shahid Hassan,Sunil Pazhayanur Venkateswaran,Vishna Devi Nadarajah

    Abstract : BackgroundWorkshops are the most common models to enhance knowledge and skills in a specific subject area with an intent to explore, solve a problem and/or innovate new things. The most important aspect of a workshop is the transfer of knowledge in a safe learning environment as a faculty development activity (FDA). At International Medical University (IMU), Malaysia’s first private medical university which was established in 1992, Faculty Development Programmes (FDPs) are run throughout the year in order to enhance the knowledge and skills in teaching and assessment. In order to sustain this faculty development, IMU has a dedicated medical education unit called the IMU Centre of Education (ICE) with dedicated staff and respected faculty developers who are academic role models to the faculty of the institution. However, FDA are collaboratively run by ICE and IMU Centre for lifelong learning (ICL).>ObjectivesTo determine the immediate impact of faculty development workshops for health professionals in teaching schools of IMU to enhance the teaching and assessment abilities of the faculty.>MethodologyA retrospective quantitative research design was developed to collect data from multiple standard setting workshops using a 3-point Likert scale. A 20 items questionnaire as a pretest from the participants with and without the prior reading of online posted reading materials. An interventional hands-on workshop and a post-test score, using the same 20 items questionnaire, followed the workshop intervention. A collated quantitative data were gathered from a sample of 139 participants attending the standard setting workshops. Data were analysed using paired t test, one-way ANOVA and ANCOVA with effect size in SPSS version 24.>ResultsA mean difference between pretest and post-test score was significant at t (138) = 92.24, p 

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  • Non-Empirical Research 2020-11-25

    Experiential learning with virtual reality: animal handling training

    Florence Mei Kuen Tang,Ray Mau Fung Lee,Roy Hok Lai Szeto,Justin Chak Ting Cheung,Olivia Miu Yung Ngan

    Abstract : Training in handling laboratory animals is fundamentally imperative to the responsible use of animals in research. Animal welfare topic is underdeveloped in the tertiary education, where instruction is majorly delivered in the format of lecture and group discussion only. Students with limited exposure to the laboratory were inattentive to animal welfare and uncertain how ethics intertwine with science. This paper describes a multi-disciplinary experience in developing and implementing virtual reality (VR) simulation to enhance contextual learning of using animal models in research with digital technology in biomedical science teaching at higher education. The in-house developed courseware consists of student-centred stimulations designed with game elements implemented at the tutorial session. At the first game level, the setting situates at in the preparation room that requires learners to apply the laboratory safety knowledge to wear personal protective equipment. At the second game level, the environment situates at the restricted experimental room to perform hands-on injections on mice. If the learner fails to pick up appropriate safety equipment at the first level, the learner is prohibited from entering the next level. During the simulation, the learner’s interaction is also displayed to the monitor that supports parallel teaching to the larger class. At the debriefing, 3Rs principles were reinforced as a sample framework for performing humane animal research. We illustrate how the hybrid uses of VR technology with gamification, together with didactic pedagogy, offers promise in enforcing working knowledge into better task performance, specifically research skills training. Our experience and students’ feedback show using immersive VR for educational purposes to encourage the learner applying conceptual knowledge in the simulated laboratory setting. Further application of VR in science for vocational training or higher education is feasible to engage students or stakeholders from various disciplines.

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July, 2022

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Innovation and
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ISSN(Online) 2524-8502