Innovation and
Education

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Empirical Research

Published online April 21, 2021 https://doi.org/10.1186/s42862-021-00009-9

Copyright © Innovation and Education.

Evaluation of immediate impact of Faculty Development Programme using a pretestâ

Shahid Hassan1,Sunil Pazhayanur Venkateswaran1,Vishna Devi Nadarajah1

School of Medicine and IMU Centre for Education, International Medical University (IMU), Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

Correspondence to:Shahid Hassan

Received: May 26, 2020; Accepted: March 31, 2021

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Abstract

Background

Workshops are the most common models to enhance knowledge and skills in a specific subject area with an intent to explore, solve a problem and/or innovate new things. The most important aspect of a workshop is the transfer of knowledge in a safe learning environment as a faculty development activity (FDA). At International Medical University (IMU), Malaysia’s first private medical university which was established in 1992, Faculty Development Programmes (FDPs) are run throughout the year in order to enhance the knowledge and skills in teaching and assessment. In order to sustain this faculty development, IMU has a dedicated medical education unit called the IMU Centre of Education (ICE) with dedicated staff and respected faculty developers who are academic role models to the faculty of the institution. However, FDA are collaboratively run by ICE and IMU Centre for lifelong learning (ICL).>

Objectives

To determine the immediate impact of faculty development workshops for health professionals in teaching schools of IMU to enhance the teaching and assessment abilities of the faculty.>

Methodology

A retrospective quantitative research design was developed to collect data from multiple standard setting workshops using a 3-point Likert scale. A 20 items questionnaire as a pretest from the participants with and without the prior reading of online posted reading materials. An interventional hands-on workshop and a post-test score, using the same 20 items questionnaire, followed the workshop intervention. A collated quantitative data were gathered from a sample of 139 participants attending the standard setting workshops. Data were analysed using paired t test, one-way ANOVA and ANCOVA with effect size in SPSS version 24.>

Results

A mean difference between pretest and post-test score was significant at t (138) = 92.24, p < 0.01. A barely significant difference of mean scores between pre-read, partially read and not-read participants was found at F (1, 136) = 9.402, p =  < 0.05 and η2 = 0.121 by one-way ANOVA. A post-test difference of the mean scores across those read, partially read and not-read for reading materials on a controlled pretest score determined by one-way ANCOVA remained non-significant at F (1, 136) = 0.240, p = 0.787 associated with a practical effect size = 0.4% only.>

Conclusion

A significant difference of the mean pretest and post-test score within the group was also significant between the groups. A post-test score, controlling on pretest score, was found not significant and is suggestive of an effectively delivered workshop for all participants. As a practical guide, a 7-step plan is recommended to ensure immediate impact of FDP. Majority of the participants rated the workshop as good in terms of content, organisation, delivery and usefulness. A high percentage of survey respondents reported that similar workshops to be offered in future.

Keywords: Faculty Development Programme, Workshops, Pretest, Post-test, Quantitative evaluation

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